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Foyles, once a byword for old-fashioned, fogeyish interiors, is demonstrating the latest technology in its outlet in the City of London

Foyles on Charing Cross Road is loved by its customers for its rarefied, fogeyish air. Its interiors were characterised by wobbling piles of books and overfilled shelves groaning with the most obscure publications. It has since tidied up its act at its flagship and, in a particularly intemperate moment, has embraced the bleeding-edge technology of LED lighting at its new outlet at the One New Change shopping mall in the City of London.

Foyles didn’t specify the LEDs, however. Land Securities, the owner, manager and landlord of One New Change, was keen that its retailers embraced low-energy lighting. So much so that it produced a comprehensive fit-out guide, detailing the latest designs. The outlet was a showpiece ‘white box’ to demo the benefits of LEDs.

Think of the energy use

‘Retailers, especially mid-range ones, often fill their spaces with lots of luminaires without thinking about energy,’ says Rob Mitchell of Philips, the supplier of the lighting kit. The company supplied StyliD LED spots on a Dali track, all on a time-controlled network-based Dynalite system.

The Philips StyliD has colour rendering of Ra>80

The Philips StyliD has colour rendering of Ra>80

‘The idea was to show retailers that LED lighting with the appropriate controls could work in a standard outlet,’ says Mitchell.

‘It’s a very interesting effort,’ says lighting energy expert Miles Pinniger. ‘It’s still not there yet in terms of colour quality but it’s amazing to think we’ve come so far in such a short time with LEDs.’

Foyles One New Change outlet is a showpiece for the benefits of LEDs

Foyles One New Change outlet is a showpiece for the benefits of LEDs

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