PROJECTS

Sutton Vane Associates (SVA) completed the lighting design for Liverpool’s new 13,000m2 museum.

The £70 million Museum of Liverpool opens its doors today. It is the largest national museum to be built in the UK in a century.

Daylight is a major feature to the architecture, designed to incorporate giant picture windows.

In the final days before the grand opening, SVA adjusted more than 1,000 lockable, track-mounted spotlights throughout the museum, designed to highlight individual artefacts.

SVA’s Mark Sutton Vane said: ‘We carried out extensive daylighting studies of the Museum of Liverpool, which enabled us to develop a lighting scheme that takes the architecture fully into account and is adaptable, efficient and more than able to cope with the demands of a museum of this scale.’

Lighting controls have been installed, allowing levels to be adjusted across the museum. The DMX-addressable LED spotlights and a modular LED system provide cool white ceiling lighting.

LED floodlights are used for a multimedia, immersive production describing the famous rivalry between Everton and Liverpool football clubs. LED panels have also been used to create a glowing timeline exhibit.

T5 fluorescents provide under-seat lighting and fibre optic light boxes are used in the museum’s City Soldiers Gallery.

Specially made fittings include replicas of original railway station lighting, which conceal compact fluorescent GLD replacement lamps and luminaries used for room sets, such as an old chip shop.

The view from the Museum of Liverpool’s large windows includes the Port of Liverpool Building, also lit by SVA.

Museum of Liverpool suppliers

Precision Lighting
Mike Stoane
Light Projects
Lucent Lighting
Festive Lights
ACDC Lighting Systems
Aldabra Lighting/Strategic Lighting
Designed Architectural Lighting
DMA Rosco
Great British Lighting
iGuzzini
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