NEWS
Luminaire efficacy to rise to 60 lm/W in regs

The minimum efficacy of light fittings is set to rise from 55 lumens per circuit watt to 60 in the 2013 version of the Building Regulations.


The consultation document on the proposed changes to Part L – the energy-efficiency part of the regulations – was officially published last night by the Department of Communities and Local Government and, as predicted exclusively by Lux magazine, it includes the energy-efficient lighting measure LENI.

LENI will be an alternative to the the current method of calculating lighting efficienc, which is based on specifying minimum levels of performance (in lumens per circuit watt) for light fittings. This is set to rise to 60 lumens per circuit watt, which has been dubbed a ‘challenging’ target by sources.

LENI – the lighting energy numeric indicator – is based on a complex calculation of factors and will be an alternative to current luminaire-efficacy approach. It takes a more holistic approach and is expressed in kWh/m2 per year, making it easier to set a minimum and compare buildings.

If LENI achieves widespread adoption, then in future editions of Part L it could become the sole method.
The Government department responsible for the regulations, the Department of Communiities and Local Government, said it had been persuaded that the addition of LENI would improve the regs, a move that was welcomed by the Lighting Industry Association and the Society of Light and Lighting, who campaigned for the change.
Comments are invited on the proposals, which can be found
here

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